SnapRoute Snags $25M With AT&T, Microsoft Backing

SnapRoute, a developer of open source networking software, on Tuesday announced that it has raised US$25 million in Series A financing from an investor group led by Norwest Venture Partners with new support from AT&T and Microsoft Ventures.

SnapRoute, which was founded by CEO Jason Forrester and other former engineers from Apple, plans to use the funding to speed up the development of open source networking software for Fortune 500 firms. The company uses its software on commodity “white-box” switches and routers to create more streamlined and scalable data centers.

Lightspeed Venture Partners is the lead seed investor. Norwest Partner Rama Sekhar will join the SnapRoute board of directors, which already includes Lightspeed Partner John Vrionis, Joe Sexton, the former president of AppDynamics, who joined the board in November, and SnapRoute CEO Forrester.

SnapRoute has managed to challenge legacy players that previously dominated the market, Forrester said, adding that SnapRoute’s software is more agile, flexible and affordable.

Scale Breakthrough

“SnapRoute is disrupting the multibillion dollar networking market by fundamentally changing how networks are built and scaled today,” said Rama Sekhar, partner at Norwest Venture Partners.

“By disaggregating software from hardware, SnapRoute is offering flexibility that has historically eluded the networking industry,” he told LinuxInsider.

The investment is Microsoft’s first in the networking software business, company rep Jay Peters told LinuxInsider.

SnapRoute is “filling a gap in how network engineers work” by providing an open networking stack that is highly scalable, said Nagraj Kashyap, corporate vice president at Microsoft Ventures, which allows companies to lower costs and engineers to work more efficiently.

AT&T and Microsoft have major investments in data centers, and SnapRoute’s software offers the flexibility to use equipment for different vendors while supporting an open architecture, Tirias Resarch Principal Analyst Jim McGregor told LinuxInsider.

The investment comes about three months after SnapRoute and Dell EMC announced plans to deepen their commitment to the Linux Foundation’s OpenSwitch project. The Linux-based OS had been led by Hewlett Packard Enterprises, however that firm later decided to scale back its leadership position on the open source project, which was designed to take on market incumbents like Cisco.

The OpenSwitch Effort

HPE originally launched the OpenSwitch community in October 2015, with a series of partners including Broadcom, VMware, Accton, Intel and Arista.

“The real value in making the source visible is when dealing with testers or partners there can be a more collaborative partnership,” Peter Christy, a research director at 451 Research, told LinuxInsider.

Dell EMC contributed its Dell EMC OS10 Open Edition to the OpenSwitch community. Facebook in October announced that its Wedge 100 network switch specification had been accepted into the Open Compute Project, which was designed to develop open data centers in which the hardware and software were separated.

The company last fall announced its Voyager transponder platform, which uses Open Packet DWDM, to create an open approach for switching, routing and transport.

The platform, which works with SnapRoute on the software architecture and Celestica on the supply chain, is designed to offer a more scalable and cost-effective infrastructure for enterprise level bandwidth, especially for networks that must meed video and virtual reality needs.

Microsoft Ventures last month invested in Illusive Networks, which provides advance deception cybersecurity technology. The company late last year announced an investment in Dynamic Signal, a communications platform that allows companies to interact with employees across multiple type of devices and channels.

David Jones is a freelance writer based in Essex County, New Jersey. He has written for Reuters, Bloomberg, Crain's New York Business and The New York Times.

Leave a Comment

Please sign in to post or reply to a comment. New users create a free account.

Related Stories

CRM Buyer Channels

SPONSORED CONTENT

Knowledge Management: The Silent Star of Modern Service

Think back to March 2020; the arrival of the pandemic disrupted your home life and your work life, as public and private organizations struggled to implement virtual solutions to keep work, school, and the economy going as best it could. Daily life quickly became a transition to working over video connections, homeschooling our own children; ordering groceries online, and learning to cook became new mandates.

Even adjusting to virtual happy hours and navigating virtual-only IT help and office support were new challenges. Employees working in contact centers or service roles were suddenly sitting at home with only a computer, attempting assist customers with service issues — with no supervisor or colleagues to lean on for assistance.

Accomplishing these tasks back then was virtually impossible without the ability to find information and knowledge online. The pandemic’s impact on business operations rallied organizations to push for new and better KM solutions. Nothing like a pandemic to help us understand how knowledge underpins service operations!

Today, the start of the post-Covid business environment reveals knowledge management is making even stronger strides, strengthening hybrid approaches to working and supporting the ability to implement AI and machine learning application innovations at scale.

The Power of KM Tools

Knowledge management is a business process formalizing the creation, capture, management, governance, and use of an organization’s intellectual assets. It consumes the top of spend for AI apps for customer service organizations and it powers virtual assistant and smart bot utterances.

According to Oracle’s KM platform developers, knowledge management has shone a spotlight on the need to access what organizations know, regardless of where their employees are located, whether in home offices or regional work centers. It provides organizations with the know-how needed to support agent work processes. This includes fluidly mixing home and work lives, sharing internet connections and home space among working parents and kids in virtual classrooms.

In essence, KM helps to bring the wisdom of the office environment to the desktop. Since 2020 people have been meeting by video calls 50 percent more than pre-Covid. During that interim, close to 70 percent of full-time employees have worked from home.

Knowledge management helped make this possible in four critical ways:

  • In today’s virtual world where we cannot just ask the person sitting next to us for support, KM becomes the new foundation for service. “What we know” is available to employees regardless of “where they may sit.”
  • KM provides a single source of truth helping employees determine good information from bad. The increase of information means more data to go through to determine what is good and what is bad. The explosion of data creates 2.5 quintillion bytes of data each day, making it hard to determine the veracity of the information being shared.
  • When contact centers and support services were either offline or completely overwhelmed, knowledge management came to the rescue, allowing customers the ability to solve their own issues on their own.
  • Knowledge provided the backbone for organizations to quickly spin up virtual assistants, chatbots, and AI to fill in the gaps of employee shortages.

It’s safe to say that knowledge management really is the brainpower of the organization. Oracle’s Knowledge Management platform enables the organization to “know what it knows” and enables employees and agents to flag gaps in know-how and problem-solving information knowledge underpins every customer touch point. In this new future of service, KM is the fuel to power smarter, faster, and virtually accessible information management.

New World, New Challenges

Today’s deluge of data so swamps businesses that they fail to meet their customers’ expectations and drown in $75 billion in lost revenue yearly.

To find that buried data takes some 3.5 billion searches per day. On average, Google now processes more than 40,000 searches every second.

More remote employees means more dispersed information, and more need for organizations to harness data to provide their customers and employees with a unified, cohesive experience.

Time is money. Employees spend an average of 36 percent of their time each workday searching for information. That is a tremendous impact on their workloads considering that 88 percent of the organizations worldwide made it mandatory or encouraged their employees to work from home after Covid-19 was declared a pandemic.

Given this sea of information floating around, think of the KM platform as a both rescue and a transportation vessel for billions of business bits and bytes. Oracle’s tools do more than preserve knowledge. They allow workers to quickly preview content with accurate formatting and embedded assets.

The Future

It’s become evident that virtual or hybrid work environments are likely to become standard fixtures for organizations. Knowledge management will continue to play and imperative role, as the need for collaboration and the ability to share and find organizational information virtually at any time only increases.

The growing need for other technologies such as content management, enterprise search, CRM, and IoT devices and support is increasing demand for a single source of truth which can only be offered by enterprise knowledge management.

Oracle’s knowledge is a powerful solution, which in integrates seamlessly with other technologies, allowing organizations to easily meet the demand of both employees and customers in this new workforce reality.

The future of everything is data. Oracle — as a data company — does data better than anyone; and our differentiated service automation tools — including knowledge management — empower businesses to run as efficiently as possible while creating competitive differentiations which enables organizations to drive efficiency and facilitate org growth with agility, precision, and speed:

  • Articles are tagged with essential meta data to make know-how findable by product, category, and content collection type.
  • Knowledge Search enables agents to ask a natural language question and get precise, helpful results back, easily scannable in a search results page.
  • The Article History function shows all the article versions and their respective meta data.
  • The Side-by-Side option lets authors quickly identify what has changed between versions.
  • Editing articles is proficient with the included WYSIWYG Editor that provides rich text authoring with HTML support. Comments let authors collaborate and track suggestions and edits.
  • Hierarchical Products and Categories tool helps users organize the knowledge base, while the Control Visibility option lets content creators disperse the article to ensure the information gets to the correct audience.
  • Search and Browse Knowledge provides a free-form search that agents can use to augment their product understanding and training.
  • Recommended Knowledge leverages machine learning to find articles that match the service request. Its search parameters allow agents to find more articles that help resolve the service request.

How Organizations Benefit

Now, more than ever, the ability to have a central repository of organizational know-how, assets, guidance, and learning is critical as employees must work together while physically apart. Oracle has a broad portfolio of cloud-based knowledge, content, and learning products to compose employee and customer-centric experiences that address the needs of hybrid and at-home workers.

Oracle Content Management offers comprehensive digital asset management, including video indexing and storage, while Oracle Knowledge helps manage answers to frequently asked questions, and Oracle Intelligent Advisor enables coaching, guidance, and policy orchestration that can automate a variety of organizational process flows.

Oracle Learning products (Guided Learning and Learning Management) can onboard and coach employees from day one through their exit interview. Oracle Digital Assistant offers intelligent conversational UI capability to help employees navigate their digital workspaces and Oracle Virtual Builder Cloud Service provides a low-code application development framework to deliver knowledge, content, and advice to employees when they need it, to get their work done no matter where they are working — at home, or in the office.

Bottom Line

Few organizations have been able to carry on business as usual. The pandemic’s impact on business operations rallied organizations to push for new and better knowledge management solutions. Oracle’s service solutions now provide a way to sustain momentum and accelerate growth.

Trust Oracle for a contextual knowledge and content offering that enables employees to know what they know, capture what they learn, and share that learning and knowhow and content when needed to achieve their goals.

Jack M. Germain has been an ECT News Network reporter since 2003. His main areas of focus are enterprise IT, Linux and open-source technologies. He is an esteemed reviewer of Linux distros and other open-source software. In addition, Jack extensively covers business technology and privacy issues, as well as developments in e-commerce and consumer electronics. Email Jack.

Leave a Comment

Please sign in to post or reply to a comment. New users create a free account.