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Sharp Rolls Out 3D LCD for Desktops

By ECT News Hardware Desk TechNewsWorld ECT News Network
Aug 9, 2004 1:18 PM PT

Sharp Systems of America, a division of Sharp Electronics, has introduced the Sharp LL-151-3D display, Sharp's first stand-alone display that features Sharp's 3D LCD Technology, formerly available only in a laptop from the company.

Sharp Rolls Out 3D LCD for Desktops

This 15-inch 3D LCD monitor delivers 3D images to the naked eye, and can be switched between 2D and 3D viewing for standard applications, such as spreadsheets, word processing or e-mail.

Sharp's target market with this monitor includes segments that are already familiar with 3D systems. For example, users of graphics cards that currently support OpenGL 3D displays with glasses (such as the Nvidia Quadro cards) will be able to shed those glasses because the 3D effect in the new Sharp display is part of the screen and does not require special lenses.

Target markets include medical imaging, CAD and other design applications. Sharp hopes the LL-151-3D will also appeal to gamers looking to bring a greater amount of realism to their gaming experiences.

"The fourth wave of LCD technology is here, and Sharp is at the forefront delivering a practical solution that allows users the freedom to view both 2D and 3D images in one monitor," said Ian Matthew, 3D Business Development Manager for Sharp Systems of America.

"The LL-151-3D display provides users with crisp 3D visualization, and the ability to add a level of visual interaction to their applications that has been previously very cumbersome to attain."

Sharp's 3D LCD Technology

Developed jointly by Sharp Corporation and Sharp Laboratories Europe, Sharp hopes the new TFT 3D LCD technology will revolutionize the visual experience by offering a realistic sense of depth and presence that hasn't been previously available in LCD displays.

Using a parallax barrier, light from the LCD is divided so that different patterns reach the viewer's left and right eyes. The direction in which light leaves the display is controlled so that the left and right eyes see different images.

When centered in front of the display, each eye receives the correct visual information for the brain to process. This makes it possible for the image on the screen to appear in three dimensions without the user having to wear special goggles.

"Sharp's TFT 3D LCD technology works on the principle of displaying left and right eye views that are separated so that the left eye sees only the left eye image, and the right eye sees only the right eye image," explained Matthew.

Because these images have perspective and are offset in the same way that the human eye normally sees the two images, the brain naturally interprets the image disparity and creates a sense-of-depth effect. The result is a 3D display that provides users with a visual experience previously unattainable without polarized or liquid crystal shuttering lenses.

LL-151-3D

The new display is equipped with built-in stereo speakers and is compatible with both analog and digital video inputs.

The LL-151-3D features a color-management function compatible with the sRGB international standard for color reproduction. By performing color conversions that adjust to liquid crystal characteristics, the LL-151-3D is designed to display pictures with natural tones.

The Sharp LL-151-3D comes with a software bundle to support its 3D and multimedia capability. The LL-151-3D is available in black for US$1,499.


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